Helping Teens Understand the Dangers of Distracted Driving

A study conducted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration found that 20% of drivers between the ages of 18-20 believe texting while behind the wheel has no impact on their driving capabilities. This research suggests that drivers who are in their teens have a poor grasp of the dangers of distracted driving. Therefore, it falls on parents to inform their kids about the dangers of distracted driving, and we at Richard Schwartz & Associates want to help you get the point across!

Statistics Can Make the Difference

Some teenagers are always on their phones, which makes it difficult for parents to persuade teens to put their phones away while behind the wheel. However, using statistics in the conversation can show teens that distracted driving is detrimental to their health. It’s near impossible to argue that distracted driving is healthy when someone comes to realize that distracted driving killed 3,447 people in 2015.

Be a Model

Practicing what you preach is undoubtedly an important aspect of persuading your kids that distracted driving is dangerous behavior. If you tell your teens that distracted driving can kill, but then call your friend while behind the wheel, it defeats your argument, and may lead your kids to think that distracted driving isn’t as big a deal as you have made it out to be. However, if you model how someone can refuse to answer the phone or text while behind the wheel, your teenagers may see that you mean business. As the old saying goes, “Don’t do anything I wouldn’t do!”

Find Testimonials

As distracted driving is an epidemic across the United States, there are plenty of testimonial stories that show the outcomes of distracted driving. News stories like this can be used to show your loved ones how distracted driving can impact lives. These stories make the consequences of distracted driving tangible and real, something many teens need before they make a change in their habits.

Sometimes we need to realize the potential impact of our actions before we make healthy changes, but teens may need an extra push in the right direction. We hope this short list of tips helps you inform your loved ones about the dangers of distracted driving.

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